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The fraternities and sororities provided a social community and held the promise of valuable future business--mostly for men in the early days--and social contacts with those who belonged to chapters at other colleges of the same house.At some point, major universities and colleges that still retain the Greek system will need to consider whether the Greek system, on balance, still serves a useful purpose or is an anachronism from a different time.This process is for men hoping to join one of 23 fraternities, many with facilities.This is a very formal process, but men may join outside of the process during spring recruitment, which is very informal.This is particularly relevant at those universities and colleges that offer many opportunities for social interaction, community service, and leadership, all of which draw upon various student abilities and fulfill diverse student interest and needs.

Fraternities and sororities were first founded in the late 1700’s as opportunities for students to gather outside of the classroom to debate and discuss their coursework free from professors and other administrators.

That fall, he enrolled at Dartmouth, where he had wanted to go for as long as he could remember.

His late grandfather, Austin Lohse, had played football and lacrosse for Big Green, and both Andrew and his older brother, Jon, a Dartmouth junior, idolized him as the embodiment of the high-achieving, hard-drinking, fraternal ethos of the Dartmouth Man, or what Lohse calls a "true bro." A Dartmouth Man is a specific type of creature, and when I ask Lohse what constitutes true bro-ness, he provides an idealized portrait of white-male privilege: "good-looking, preppy, charismatic, excellent at cocktail parties, masculine, intelligent, wealthy (or soon to become so), a little bit rough around the edges" – not, in other words, a "douchey, superpolished Yalie." A true bro, Lohse adds, can also drink inhuman amounts of beer, vomit profusely and keep on going, and perform a number of other hard-partying feats – Dartmouth provided the real-life inspiration for – that most people, including virtually all of Lohse's high school friends, would find astounding.

While fraternities and sororities are quite wonderful experiences for some, we need to inquire whether on balance they have outlived their usefulness. The Greek System in 2015 I begin with a question: Were the Greek system proposed today as way of improving campus life for colleges and universities, would it be approved?

I am convinced that at most colleges and universities, the answer would be "No." At Cornell, where I teach, with over 1000 extra-curricular and service activities and a plethora of ways to find a comfortable community of friends, what would be the reason for approving such a system?